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Claudine O’Sullivan Illustrations

Artist on Tumblr | Facebook|  MBC

This stunning illustration by final year student Claudine O’Sullivan was judged the winner of the The Coffee Art Project 2013. Chosen from 85 entrants, her watercolour ink and pencil illustration on Khadi paper, will be auctioned to raise funds for Project Waterfall, a charity that work alongside coffee producers to provide water filtration in Tanzania and other coffee producing African countries.

Claudine, who is graduating from BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design, Illustration and Visual Media pathway, will be showing her final work at London College of Communication’s Summer Show Three from 21 – 28 June 2013.

A traditional illustrator specialising in portraiture, she works mainly in pencil, watercolour and ink and her vivid, abstract portraits are gaining her plenty of praise, with a solo exhibition under her belt in 2013 and an exciting collaboration planned next year.

Her documentation of her time working at an Orphanage in Jaipur, which made up part of a solo exhibition in March, impressed the Managing Director of Allegra, who funded the Coffee Art Project. And a similar trip to Tanzania to photograph and document the work done by Project Waterfall may also be on the cards for early next year.

Claudine has also collaborated on a campaign with domestic violence charity Southall Black Sisters that works with women who have suffered domestic abuse. And with such raw honesty a feature of her beautiful illustrations it’s no surprise charities are keen to have her help them highlight the human faces behind their causes.

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Thirty Pieces of Silver by Cornelia Parker

Photograph by Shannon Tofts.

London-based sculptor and installation artist Cornelia Parker has an affinity for smashing things. According to her bio, the artist “is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’—steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions.” So it makes perfect sense that in Thirty Pieces of Silver, the artist had 1,116 silver objects flattened with a steamroller so that she could turn them into this thought-provoking, suspended installation.

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MONOLITT  by  Syver Lauritzsen

MONOLITT is an interactive installation that quite literally paints the mood of the city, using social media feeds as an input. The installation takes electronic signals and lets them manifest themselves in the physical world. Using sentiment analytics, the installation links tweets to corresponding colored paints in realtime, feeding them out through the top of the sculpture, letting them flow into a procedurally generated three-dimensional painting.

Wacth the Video:

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 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner

This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness

When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.

Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.

Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects